A good way to prepare a small chicken

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Anthony Sargeant prepared and cooked this Poussin (small young chicken) then divided it into two portions. It is worth the effort of removing the backbone and rib cage leaving just the leg and wing bones in the portion served up.

via Spatchcocked Poussin on a bed of Sweetheart Cabbage with Roast Potatoes — TONY Anthony SARGEANT

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Sparkling Fresh Mackerel filleted and pan-fried by Anthony Sargeant

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So important to get absolutely fresh mackerel. Anthony Sargeant bought a sparkling fresh mackerel from the Fish stall in Shrewsbury Market which he highly recommends. This is one side of a good size fish filleted and split into two pieces to remove the pin bones that run down the centre of each side. it is served on a home made salsa with a green salad and a few pieces of potato salad.

Cold Roast Beef, Chips and Salad

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Anthony Sargeant cooked small joint of beautifully marbled beef earlier in the week. Quickly sealed in a hot pan then into a fan oven at 60 degrees Celsius for an hour and a half. What was left after the first meal was very thinly sliced and served cold with chips (french fries to Americans) a salad and a few spicy stuffed red peppers.

Omelette Arnold Bennett on the plate

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The omelette cooked by Anthony Sargeant and shown in the cooking pan in the previous post is big enough for four large portions. Here the photograph shows one quarter served very simply with some peas, a spicy stuffed pepper and some pickled gherkin.

Arbroath Smokies and Potato Dauphinois

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Arbroath Smokies are a superb Scottish delicacy  says Anthony Sargeant. They are small haddock which have been hot smoked over hardwood chips thus they can be eaten without further cooking but here the meat is flaked from the bones and skin and incorporated in layers of potato dauphinois according to a recipe of Rick Stein’s and baked in a hot oven. A delicious warming meal for supper on a cold winter’s evening. Tony thinks the quantities in Rick Steins recipe are over generous, this dish cooked yesterday evening yielded four good portions using half the quantities suggested – but of course that depends on your appetite. Any not eaten keeps well in the fridge for a few days and can be reheated. For Rick Stein’s recipe see page 93 of his excellent book “Seafood lovers’ guide”.